Worth Saying Well

“It’s a unique way to process transactions between riders and drivers.”

This is an eleven word sentence that has absolutely no clear meaning. It could be referring to a “fee of a handshake” that might be imposed on the city buses. Or a new payment system in taxis that enables you to pay with something besides commonly accepted currency—like a five gallon can of gasoline, or a gift card. Maybe it’s referring to a dated method of transportation (like horse-drawn carriages) coming back into vogue.

Because there is no defining language, it’s almost impossible to judge what the sentence means. If you’re going to write stand alone sentences, try to make them crystal clear—not clear as mud. It only takes a word or two more, and sometimes it even cuts the word count:

“Shaking hands to pay for city busses makes riders trust drivers more.” (12 words)

“Taxi drivers love the new ‘pay with a gallon’ method of payment; full gas cans and gift cards accepted.” (19 words)

“Horse and buggy travel is more relational than public transportation.” (10 words)

It’s not a burden to make your language clear and easy to understand; it just takes a little more thought and intentionality. If you’re reading something that makes no sense, and has minimal explanation, two tricks to figure it out:

#) Look at the context. Even if a sentence seems to be derailed from any contextual meaning, at least it will give you some clue about what the author is talking about in general.

#) Ask for explanation. Perhaps you’re lucky enough to have a communicating relationship with the author; if not, ask other people. Sometimes a second or third pair of eyes can see what the first might have missed.

It’s not hard to avoid this by writing clearly. If it’s worth saying, it’s worth saying well.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s