Post-Publishing Depression

I wrote a novel last year, and last month I published it. Some authors fill in this space with details of euphoria, the wonder of seeing their name in written print, and the blissful ease of spouting off 85,000 words that needed no refining or editing.

I feel those things. It’s great (besides the editing thing—every writer needs an editor, whether they think so or not).

It was also hard. Very hard.

It was Saturday after Saturday crouching over my keyboard, watching the blue sky darken and imagining it was the last sunny day of fall that would happen in my lifetime. It was night after night of frustration, pre-occupation, and contemplation, as I lived in two worlds—one that I can do nothing to control, and the other that is subject to my every whim. Balancing the two realities is like trying to paint a landscape while holding a seat atop a bucking mustang (the horse, not the car). It was person after person coming back with my manuscript and telling me to “change this,” “re-write this section,” and “make this part better because it’s not good enough,” subjecting my already fragile ego to the whims of critics who, I worked to convince myself, actually knew what they were talking about.

It really wasn’t easy.

In the sweetness of post-published, it’s easy to forget the hard parts in the delight of my name on the cover of a book.

In the uphill trudge of self-marketing, I remember it again. Having published, I’m now marketing. Yesterday I emailed almost a dozen influential people, introducing myself, asking to guest post on their blogs, asking them to read and perhaps review my book.

So far, everyone has said no. Although to my practical mind, this makes sense (influential people are busy, or something like that), to my ego it’s a gentle reminder that none of them need any favors from me.

Mine is the small platform, the new book, the person that no one has heard of.

Mine is also the vision, the goals, the desire to work hard to do what I believe in, to make a difference, to foster and help my novel grow, because I wrote it and I stand behind it.

It’s not easy. But I think someday I’ll look back and acknowledge that it was all worth it. At least, that’s what I’m hoping.

Here’s a link to my book:

https://www.amazon.com/Cup-Anneliese-Rider/dp/0997838213/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

Check it out, maybe buy it, and write a review on amazon!

And thanks for reading what I have to say so faithfully.

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Post-Publishing Depression

  1. I am serious about being willing to give feedback on your next book before it is published. I am not a professional editor, but I have done an immense amount of reading in the last 55 years…

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